Tuesday, 21 April 2015

Pulitzer Prize Winners 2015 - Letters and Drama

HomeYesterday the winners of this year's Pulitzer Prizes were announced on Youtube by Pulitzer Administrator Mike Pride. Established in 1917 by Joseph Pulitzer and administered by Columbia University, the prizes are awarded yearly to work in twenty-one different categories. Each year 102 judges are selected by the board and put into separate juries for each of the categories. Great authors, poets and playwrights such as Robert Frost, William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams have been awarded in the past.

Below are the works which have been awarded in the Letters and Drama categories. Aside from these, there are also prizes in Music and Journalism (Investigative Reporting, Commentary, Criticism, etc.).

Fiction:

All the Light We Cannot See  by Anthony Doerr (Scribner)
All the Light We Cannot SeeMarie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When Marie-Laure is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris, and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.
In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.
Drama:

The Motherfucker with the Hat & Between Riverside and Crazy  by Stephen Adly Guirgis

Praise for Guirgis:"A bold, highly articulate and deceptively compassionate Stephen Adley Guirgis drama about the peaks, valleys, minefields and revelations of addiction in an urban underclass."—Chicago Tribune on The Motherfucker with the Hat
"Completely compelling . . . Galvanizing but not importunate. You could cry (I did), but you are always free simply to laugh instead."—New York onBetween Riverside and Crazy
"His empathetic, poetic tales of ex-cons, addicts, and other men whom society would label losers return us, again and again, to a world that Guirgis, by virtue of his particular religion—the church of the streets—illuminates with the bright and crooked light of his faith."—New Yorker
History:

Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People  by Elizabeth A. Fenn (Hill and Wang)
Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People

Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804–1805 with them, but why don’t we know more? Who were they really? In this extraordinary book, Elizabeth A. Fenn retrieves their history by piecing together important new discoveries in archaeology, anthropology, geology, climatology, epidemiology, and nutritional science. Her boldly original interpretation of these diverse research findings offers us a new perspective on early American history, a new interpretation of the American past.
     By 1500, more than twelve thousand Mandans were established on the northern Plains, and their commercial prowess, agricultural skills, and reputation for hospitality became famous. Recent archaeological discoveries show how these Native American people thrived, and then how they collapsed. The damage wrought by imported diseases like smallpox and the havoc caused by the arrival of horses and steamboats were tragic for the Mandans, yet, as Fenn makes clear, their sense of themselves as a people with distinctive traditions endured.
     A riveting account of Mandan history, landscapes, and people, Fenn’s narrative is enriched and enlivened not only by science and research but by her own encounters at the heart of the world.


Biography/Autobiography:

The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe  by David I. Kertzer (Random House)

The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in EuropeThe Pope and Mussolini tells the story of two men who came to power in 1922, and together changed the course of twentieth-century history. In most respects, they could not have been more different. One was scholarly and devout, the other thuggish and profane. Yet Pius XI and “Il Duce” had many things in common. They shared a distrust of democracy and a visceral hatred of Communism. Both were prone to sudden fits of temper and were fiercely protective of the prerogatives of their office. (“We have many interests to protect,” the Pope declared, soon after Mussolini seized control of the government in 1922.) Each relied on the other to consolidate his power and achieve his political goals. In a challenge to the conventional history of this period, in which a heroic Church does battle with the Fascist regime, Kertzer shows how Pius XI played a crucial role in making Mussolini’s dictatorship possible and keeping him in power. In exchange for Vatican support, Mussolini restored many of the privileges the Church had lost and gave in to the pope’s demands that the police enforce Catholic morality. Yet in the last years of his life—as the Italian dictator grew ever closer to Hitler—the pontiff’s faith in this treacherous bargain started to waver. With his health failing, he began to lash out at the Duce and threatened to denounce Mussolini’s anti-Semitic racial laws before it was too late. Horrified by the threat to the Church-Fascist alliance, the Vatican’s inner circle, including the future Pope Pius XII, struggled to restrain the headstrong pope from destroying a partnership that had served both the Church and the dictator for many years.
Poetry:
Digest
Digest  by Gregory Pardlo (Four Way Books)

From Epicurus to Sam Cook, the Daily News to Roots, Digest draws from the present and the past to form an intellectual, American identity. In poems that forge their own styles and strategies, we experience dialogues between the written word and other art forms. Within this dialogue we hear Ben Jonson, we meet police K-9s, and we find children negotiating a sense of the world through a father's eyes and through their own.
General Nonfiction:

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History  by Elizabeth Kolbert (Henry Holt)

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural HistoryA major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes.
Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In The Sixth Extinction, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.
All of these books sound really interesting. I'm glad to see two women on the list, although there could be more, and to see the History-category tackling some very interesting parts of American history which isn't spotlighted a lot.

Have you read any of these books? Would you like to?

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