Thursday, 30 August 2012

Throwback Thursday and Booking Through Thursday

Throwback Thursday is hosted by The Housework Can Wait and Never Too Fond of Books.

It’s the nature of book blogging to focus mainly on new releases, but there are thousands of great books out there that haven’t seen the “New Releases” shelf in years. We hope to be able to bring attention to some older titles that may not be at the top of the current bestseller list, but still deserve a spot in your To-Be-Read pile.

I decided to showcase an old book that I have started and not yet finished due to Kindle issues. I think I've mentioned this one before, but as far as I was able to read, I really love it.
If on a Winter's Night a Traveler
'If On a Winter's Night A Traveller' by Italo Calvino
This exhilarating interactive novel--in which the reader, lured into the text by the enticements of Italo Calvino's splendid intelligence, turns into the book's central character--was its author's triumphant response to the question of whether the art of fiction could survive the vast changes taking place in the communications technology of our world.
I absolutely love the interactive writing. Part of the book is a description of how the main character rezds, how he prepares to sit down and how he feels while reading. The other part of the book is the actual book the character is reading. It's really refreshing and 'new', even though the book was published in 1982.

Booking Through Thursday is hosted by BTT.


Do you find yourself thinking that the books you read would be good on film? Do you wish the things you watched on TV or in the movies were available as book?
btt buttonSome really can’t be converted, of course, but some definitely can (and it’s not always the ones you think will work). There’s something to be said for different forms of media, but a good story is universal … or is it??

I do think that a good story is universal and should, in theory, work on film. Yet the big issue with films is that
they are often how the director or scriptwriter interprets the story. If they feel strongly about a certain storyline or character, they might bring that to the foreground, whereas many readers might love the general storyline or a different character.I therefore think every book could be turned into a movie if you look at it from that perspective. But this is also where there is a difference between books and movies. While reading a book, you can enjoy your own imagination, you can make it your own. A movie is very much someone else's vision that you watch. Although your imagination is still part of it, it is not as free as when reading.


Personally, I love imagining how I would set a scene, what kind of dialogue I'd use from the book and which I'd add. It's simply a great way of entertaining myself while and after reading. I think I'm a very visual reader, all of my creative writing inspiration also comes from images I have in my head.

Also, there are scriptwriters which simply mess up the story. One of my all time favourite books, which had a great story, was completely and utterly botched up by a writer and director who had no love for the story. And that does make me hesitant at times when I hear of movie adaptations. And on a side note, some stories are actually improved when they are made into movies because a scriptwriter cuts out all of the unnecessary writing and can give a pointless story vision.

So, what do you think?

12 comments:

  1. Yes, I agree that, in books, we can employ our imagination and make the story ours...and I hate when a great book is "butchered." But I still love a good adaptation.

    I think I'm going to have to check out Throwback Thursday...I used to participate in some version of this when I started blogging.

    Here's MY THURSDAY MEMES POST

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  2. Winter's Night Traveler sounds wonderful. Thanks for stopping by. Yes, you really need to read Cold Mountain before you see the movie. I thought the movie was miscast.

    New Follower!
    Kendal
    Kinx's Book Nook

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  3. Hey Juli,

    It's true that the screen adaptations of books are up to the director's interpretation but sometimes I feel like it's interesting to see. And yes sometimes it will be a major disappointment but I think in those cases it's best to go in knowing what to expect: A few hundred pages of novel being condensed into an hour and a half. :)
    thanks for stopping by!

    Aspen
    http//inner-aspen.blogspot.com

    PS. Interactive writing sounds interesting. I'm having a hard time picturing how that is but thanks for another book to add to my TBR!

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  4. I agree with you, however, when the scriptwriter gets it, a movie can be very good, but that seldom happens. I did think the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" came out well in movie form. I enjoyed both the book and the movie.

    Thanks for the visit today.

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  5. They sometimes ruin the story with a lot left out when made into a movie.

    http://tributebooksmama.blogspot.com/2012/08/booking-through-thursday_30.html

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  6. Awesome post, and I love this idea for a meme! I agree with what you said - I get so upset when they mess it up.

    By the way, really like your blog, the header is wonderful. :)

    Jessica :D xxx
    www.bookedupbloggers.blogspot.com

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  7. I like to imagine my books rather than watching it on screen!

    Here is my post!

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  8. I hate to see a good book ruined when made into a movie.

    http://theplotthickensbookblog.blogspot.com/2012/08/booking-through-thursday.html

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  9. I love 'If On a Winter's Night A Traveller' (and now feel like rereading it).

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  10. I agree - there are times I wish a book was a movie. It doesn't always work out though.

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  11. Sometimes I wish a book were a movie. Other times I prefer it the way it is because of the rare insights we get into a characters mind with the written word.

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  12. I am fascinated with the idea of a book within a book. What would be really weird would be if you liked the story of the reader, but not the "book" he was reading, or vice versa. Great pick! Thanks for participating!

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